PACE is a bipartisan government relations consulting firm based in the nation's capital. (703) 518-8600

Scott Dacey, Partner

Scott Dacey has been engaged in government affairs since 1983, having worked in the federal government, the Wisconsin State Legislature, and as a registered lobbyist and political consultant. In the mid 80’s he served as a staff member in the Wisconsin legislature’s Senate Republican Caucus and participated in a number of successful political campaigns throughout Wisconsin. In 1989, he was appointed by President George H.W. Bush to serve as legislative liaison for the Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration. During his tenure he managed the implementation of several successful policy reform initiatives, including expanding the small business set-aside program to Indian tribes and native people.

In 1991, Scott established a government affairs consulting presence in Washington, DC and has since focused primarily on matters impacting tribal governments, natural resources, trust land management, and gaming.  In 1997, he took a leave from PACE to become the Chief of Staff at the National Indian Gaming Commission, the federal government’s lead regulatory agency of gaming conducted on tribal lands.

Scott also brings a unique aspect to his work as a government relations consultant as he also serves as a local elected official in North Carolina, where he makes his home. First elected in 2010, he is one of seven commissioners serving on the Craven County Board of Commissioners, serving as chairman from 2012-2013.  As an elected office holder he has gained a unique perspective on the dynamics that impact the work of a Member of Congress, from both the electoral perspective and through the development of public policy.  Through this experience he is able to bring a unique understanding of how public policy initiatives need to be developed at the local level to be successful at the federal level.

Scott Dacey is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee and holds a B.A. in Political Science.